hi-diddle-diddle


hi-diddle-diddle
I.
/ˌhaɪ-dɪdl-ˈdɪdl/ (say .huy-didl-'didl)

noun
hey-diddle-diddle1.
II.
/ˌhaɪ-dɪdl-ˈdɪdl/ (say .huy-didl-'didl)

noun
hey-diddle-diddle2.

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling, My Son John — Roud #19709 Written by Traditional Published 1797 Written England Language English Form Nursery rhyme Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling, My Son John is an English language nursery rhyme. It has a Roud Folk Song Index num …   Wikipedia

  • diddle — to cheat, swindle, 1806, from dial. duddle, diddle to totter (1630s). Meaning waste time is recorded from 1825. Meaning to have sex with is from 1879; that of to masturbate (especially of women) is from 1950s. More or less unrelated meanings that …   Etymology dictionary

  • diddle — diddle1 [did′ l] vt. diddled, diddling [dial. duddle, diddle, to totter, akin to DODDER1] 1. Informal to move back and forth in a jerky or rapid manner; jiggle 2. Slang a) to have sexual intercourse with b) …   English World dictionary

  • Diddle — Did dle, v. i. [Cf. {Daddle}.] To totter, as a child in walking. [Obs.] Quarles. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Diddle — Did dle, v. t. [Perh. from AS. dyderian to deceive, the letter r being changed to l.] To cheat or overreach. [Colloq.] Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • diddle — did‧dle [ˈdɪdl] verb [transitive] informal to get money from someone by deceiving them: • I m sure he diddled me out of quite a lot of money! …   Financial and business terms

  • diddle — ► VERB informal ▪ cheat or swindle. ORIGIN probably from Jeremy Diddler, a character in the farce Raising the Wind (1803) who constantly borrowed small sums of money …   English terms dictionary

  • diddle — diddle1 diddler, n. /did l/, v.t., diddled, diddling. Informal. to cheat; swindle; hoax. [1800 10; perh. special use of DIDDLE2] diddle2 diddler, n. /did l/, v., diddled, diddling …   Universalium

  • diddle-daddle — I. |didəl|dadəl noun ( s) Etymology: origin unknown : fussing, trifling, fiddle faddle II. intransitive verb (diddle daddled ; diddle daddled ; diddle daddling ad(ə)liŋ ; diddle daddles) …   Useful english dictionary

  • diddle — [19] The current meaning of diddle, ‘to cheat or swindle’, was probably inspired by Jeremy Diddler, a character who was constantly borrowing money and neglecting to repay it in James Kenney’s play Raising the Wind (1803) (the expression raise the …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • diddle — [19] The current meaning of diddle, ‘to cheat or swindle’, was probably inspired by Jeremy Diddler, a character who was constantly borrowing money and neglecting to repay it in James Kenney’s play Raising the Wind (1803) (the expression raise the …   Word origins